Graflex.org Forum Index Graflex.org
Get help with your Graflex questions here
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Any new production lenses that will fit my Century 2x3?
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Graflex.org Forum Index -> Lenses Help
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Joey Anchors



Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 63
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2013 9:27 pm    Post subject: Any new production lenses that will fit my Century 2x3? Reply with quote

I am looking at getting the best quality set of lenses (image sharpness, good contrast) to go with my '49 Graflex Century as I just love working with this camera.

I am looking for a slight wide angle (65-70mm), standard, 100-110mm, and to long lense (?mm).

Are there any current companies that make lenses that will work with my Century?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
George B



Joined: 05 Jun 2008
Posts: 34
Location: Northern New Jersey

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 5:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's wrong with a 101mm Ektar or Optar ? What am I missing here ?
_________________
Guide Numbers: It's an inverse-square law thing... www.photoflashbulb.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Joey Anchors



Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 63
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

George, I have the Graftar 103mm which is serving me fine, but would like a bit more sharpness. What I really need is a wide angle, and tele lenses.

What would you suggest for those two? (New or Old)

Here is the sharpest photo I have taken with the 103mm using Ilford PanF Plus.

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Henry



Joined: 09 May 2001
Posts: 1446
Location: Allentown, Pennsylvania

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This doesn't answer your question, but here goes anyway. I'll echo George B, as to the Optar 101 f4.5, and add to that the Optar 65 f6.8 and Optar 203 f7.7. The 65 is a demanding lens to focus properly, but once mastered can give good results. My 203, while not a "true" telephoto, is an incredible piece of work and gives splendid results. And I have always found my Optar 101 to be capable of fine performance. The most I ever paid for a lens/shutter was my 203 in Graphex M-F-X; cost me $169 years ago. I shudder to think what the equivalent modern lenses would cost at today's prices; certainly they would be too rich for my blood!

BTW, the 103 Graftar is capable of fine results, as your photo so impressively shows. It has no tolerance for movements, possibly its only drawback, but its self-cocking shutter makes it ideal for hand-held work.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dan Fromm



Joined: 14 May 2001
Posts: 1892
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joey, many lenses can be used on a Century Graphic. To get an idea of what can be done, read my lens diary: http://www.galerie-photo.com/telechargement/dan-fromm-6x9-lenses-v2-2011-03-29.pdf

Understand that I've used only a small sample of the possible lenses.

I don't know how long a lens you'd like to use. You're more limited there because there aren't that many tele lenses for 2x3. The practical limit for a tele on a Century is around 250 mm, with a lens such as the 10"/5.6 TeleRaptar, also sold as TeleOptar But the 270/5.5 TeleArton will work too and is probably a better lens.

Henry, I have little difficulty focusing short lenses on my Century. 35/4.5 Apo-Grandagon, 47/5.6 Super Angulon, a variety of lenses around 60 mm including a 60/14 Perigraphe, and of course an 80/6.3 WF Ektar. What viewing aid do you use? I find that for short lenses a 12x magnifier gives better results than the 3.6x Toyo loupe. And is your ground glass clean? I use Satin Snow, made by Dave Parker and no longer available. I understand that Steve Hopf makes excellent GGs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dan Fromm



Joined: 14 May 2001
Posts: 1892
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Um, Joey, when I tested I found that the 103 Graflar was sharper than the 101/4.5 Ektar which, in turn, is sharper than the 105/3.7 Ektar. I have, have never used, a 101 Optar; it should be a little less good than the 101 Ektar.

Don't go chasing magic bullets. The best way to improve sharpness is to improve technique. Small differences between lenses have little effect on the results. Eliminating unsteadiness, focusing with care and using depth of field intelligently cost less than another lens and yield larger improvements in the results.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Joey Anchors



Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 63
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dan Fromm wrote:
Joey, many lenses can be used on a Century Graphic. To get an idea of what can be done, read my lens diary: http://www.galerie-photo.com/telechargement/dan-fromm-6x9-lenses-v2-2011-03-29.pdf

Understand that I've used only a small sample of the possible lenses.

I don't know how long a lens you'd like to use. You're more limited there because there aren't that many tele lenses for 2x3. The practical limit for a tele on a Century is around 250 mm, with a lens such as the 10"/5.6 TeleRaptar, also sold as TeleOptar But the 270/5.5 TeleArton will work too and is probably a better lens.

Henry, I have little difficulty focusing short lenses on my Century. 35/4.5 Apo-Grandagon, 47/5.6 Super Angulon, a variety of lenses around 60 mm including a 60/14 Perigraphe, and of course an 80/6.3 WF Ektar. What viewing aid do you use? I find that for short lenses a 12x magnifier gives better results than the 3.6x Toyo loupe. And is your ground glass clean? I use Satin Snow, made by Dave Parker and no longer available. I understand that Steve Hopf makes excellent GGs.


So far I have only used the rangefinder to do all my focusing. I'll looking out for the Apo 47/5.6. I do plan on using my ground glass (it is clean and clear with a grid). With that being said..

What size magnifier would work best for checking sharp focus using my 103mm?

I plan on using a heavy duty tripod, long shutter release cable, and the ground glass.

Joey
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dan Fromm



Joined: 14 May 2001
Posts: 1892
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joey Anchors wrote:
So far I have only used the rangefinder to do all my focusing. I'll looking out for the Apo 47/5.6. I do plan on using my ground glass (it is clean and clear with a grid). With that being said..

What size magnifier would work best for checking sharp focus using my 103mm?

Joey


I don't know which lens you mean. Ain't no 47 Apo-Grandagon or Super Angulon XL. If there were, putting one on a Century would be a waste of money 'cos the movements can't be used. Same goes for the 45/4.5 Apo Grandy.

What you want is a 47 Super Angulon. The f/5.6er covers 123 mm, more than you can use. The f/8er covers 113 mm. My 47/5.6 is in a #00, you want a newer one in a #0. Nicer shutter, easier to use. There's a 47/8 Ilex that is equivalent to the 47/8 SA, but these things are uncommon. You'll grow old waiting for one to turn up.

I use a 3.6x Toyo loupe, also have a Cambo in-line viewer that's only 1.5 x and that works fairly well. Much easier to use than a loupe. If I had to get a loupe again and had the budget I'd look for a tilting Silvestri loupe.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Joey Anchors



Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 63
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for the typo Dan the 47 Super Angulon was what I meant. Now it's time to start saving for it one.



Should I go with the Toyo loupe or a focusing loupe?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dan Fromm



Joined: 14 May 2001
Posts: 1892
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joey Anchors wrote:
Should I go with the Toyo loupe or a focusing loupe?


I don't know, don't even know if the Toyo is still available. Check with Calumet in Center City to see what they have, go in and try 'em.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Joey Anchors



Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 63
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ahh I forgot about that place. Thanks again Dan!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Henry



Joined: 09 May 2001
Posts: 1446
Location: Allentown, Pennsylvania

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dan Fromm wrote:

Henry, I have little difficulty focusing short lenses on my Century. 35/4.5 Apo-Grandagon, 47/5.6 Super Angulon, a variety of lenses around 60 mm including a 60/14 Perigraphe, and of course an 80/6.3 WF Ektar. What viewing aid do you use? I find that for short lenses a 12x magnifier gives better results than the 3.6x Toyo loupe. And is your ground glass clean? I use Satin Snow, made by Dave Parker and no longer available. I understand that Steve Hopf makes excellent GGs.


Dan, I use the Toyo 3.6x. Could be that a more powerful loupe would work better, as you say. OTOH, I think the larger problem is that the focus mechanism on the Century is rather coarse, which makes it difficult to find the "sweet spot" with the 65 (that's the widest lens I've tried to use). Don't think my gg is the problem, as it too is a Parker Satin Snow. I even had the foresight to have him cut me four 2x3 gg's so I'd have an ample supply of spares; for now-obvious reasons, I'm especially glad that I did that! I should just go back to using the 8x loupe with the 65; the Toyo works fine with the other lenses. Probably removing the Ektalite screen would make things easier, too; as you know, it does brighten the image somewhat, but at the expense of introducing those annoying concentric circles.

Another possible source for the Toyo loupe is B&H Photo; that's where I got mine, but that was some time ago.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3258
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
OTOH, I think the larger problem is that the focus mechanism on the Century is rather coarse, which makes it difficult to find the "sweet spot"

I think Graflex used the same 1:2 gear ratio pinion:track on all of their Graphic series cameras. The part number for complete yoke for the first series Pacemakers and a Singer ownership Century are the same except for the suffix. Pacemaker Crown early production (4x5) and a 1960's Super Graphic have 8 helical gears on the pinion and 16 tpi gear teeth on the rail. The rail teeth are positioned at a 45 angle.
--------
A while back I serviced two Century Graphics for a nearby forum member.
One had a 101mm Ektar and one had a 103mm Graftar. The Graftar was noticeably sharper viewing on the ground glass.
_________________
The best camera ever made is the one that YOU enjoy using and produces the image quality that satifies YOU.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Joey Anchors



Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 63
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Will the Schneider f6.8 65mm Angulon have enough coverage for my Century when using the 6x9 film back?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
45PSS



Joined: 28 Sep 2001
Posts: 3258
Location: Mid Peninsula, Ca.

PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 9:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Will the Schneider f6.8 65mm Angulon have enough coverage for my Century when using the 6x9 film back?


Lets find out by first going to http://www.schneideroptics.com/ and clicking on the vintage lens data link under the info tab. Next we go to large format lens then Angulon then the f6.8 65mm to get from the specifications listed that it has a 109mm image circle @f16 and an 81 angle of view.

Now a 2x3 film camera has a 2 1/4 inch x 3 1/4 inch film size (5.715cm x 8.225 cm) which is rounded up to the next whole centimeter for ease of general use.
A 6x9 film holder will have a 5.6 cm high film opening and vary in length from 7.2 cm to 7.8 cm depending on make and vintage. Using the nominal size for the 2x3 format the image circle size to cover it is √2.25+3.25=√5.0625+10.5625=√15.625=3.953 convert to millimeters 3.953*25.4=100.4 millimeters.
Answer: yes with some room for movements.
_________________
The best camera ever made is the one that YOU enjoy using and produces the image quality that satifies YOU.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Graflex.org Forum Index -> Lenses Help All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 1 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group